Mobius

Stellar Network

Stellar Network

Stellar is an open-source internet protocol developed by a non-profit to move money fast and affordably. Mobius built the DApp Store on top of the Stellar Network for its various advantages.

Fees

Transaction costs are very low, close to $0 per transaction.

Speed

Transactions take 2-5 seconds and don’t require multiple confirmation blocks.

Decentralization

Network validators chose their own quorom slices - quorom slices - A Stellar validator's list of other validators they trust not to collude. The quorum slices of each validator overlap to form a quorum, or network-wide consensus on a transaction. Without the need for one centralized authority to decide on the validator list, you create an open membership network. Anyone can spin up a validator and participate in consensus if any other participating validator adds you to their quorum slice. .

Custom Assets

A more secure way to issue distributed ledger assets.

Consensus Protocol

These low fees and high speeds are a result of the Stellar Consensus Protocol - an alternative to Bitcoin’s proof-of-work consensus method.

Stellar validators - validators - Nodes store the global ledger, perform consensus, and together all the nodes make up the Stellar network. Each node is owned and maintained by different people and organizations, and, if a node is set up to participate in consensus, it is called a validator. Validators serve a purpose somewhat similar to miners in the Bitcoin network - they agree on sets of transactions every several seconds via consensus and update the global ledger. - nodes running Stellar Core - serve a purpose somewhat similar to miners in the Bitcoin network. They agree on sets of transactions every several seconds by passing cryptographically signed messages and update the global ledger.

Ledgers close every 2-5 seconds, and, because it’s just message passing, there’s no expensive computational problem-solving.

Unlike other message passing consensus protocols, there is no single, master validator list recommended by a central authority.

Rather, each validator decides which other validators they trust, and their list of trusted validators is called their quorum slice.

The quorum slices of each validator overlap to form a quorum, or network-wide consensus on a transaction.

Without the need for one centralized authority to decide on the validator list, you create an open membership network. Anyone can spin up a validator and participate in consensus if any other participating validator adds you to their quorum slice. Because there is no one master authority deciding which nodes get to participate in consensus, the network exhibits decentralization.

Quorum slices in the Stellar Consensus Protocol

Quorum slices in the Stellar Consensus Protocol

To learn more: Explain it to me like I’m five, explain it to me like I’m a college grad, and explain it to me like I’m a grad student.